“We Must Not Make This Mistake Again”

While making this mistake again. The dependency mistake. See the Russian energy dependency mistake. This time it’s the hooked on China mistake.

China is a key market for German automakers including Volkswagen, BMW and Mercedes-Benz. If not the key market. And it will remain that way, despite the German government’s latest public relations move.

German auto industry could face tougher rules over China relations – Germany’s auto industry could face tougher rules on disclosing information over its China relations.

Germany’s foreign ministry plans to tighten the rules for companies including automakers that are deeply exposed to China, making them disclose more information and possibly conduct stress tests for geopolitical risks.

Time To Ship In That Evil US-Amerikan Fracking Gas

It doesn’t stink anymore either these days, for some reason.

Germany finishes construction of its first LNG import terminal – Completion of project in just 200 days eases fears of gas shortage amid cut in Russian supplies.

Liquefied gas is to secure the energy supply in the coming years. The first plant has already been completed in Wilhelmshaven, but terminals are also likely to follow at other locations.

We Germans Condemn The Iranian Regime’s Brutality Toward Protestors

As well as their open hostility toward Israel.

But boy oh boy their gas sure doesn’t stink.

Germany in secret talks to buy Iranian oil amid Russian war sanctions – The chief economist for the partially state-owned bank LBBW in the southwestern German state of Baden-Württemberg announced that Germany is engaged in secret talks with the Islamic Republic of Iran to buy Iranian oil.

“Intensive talks are already being held behind the scenes with Venezuela, Iran or Algeria to cover Germany’s oil and gasoline needs.”

German Of The Day: Am Günstigsten

That means the cheapest, the least expensive.

You know, like “which wood is the cheapest for heating?” Firewood is big these days in Germany for some reason. How green. Or something.

Expensive oak, cheap spruce or fragrant birch? Anyone who has a fireplace or wood-burning stove in their home has a great selection to choose from when it comes to firewood...

Heating is an important issue for many households this winter. Although the prices for firewood have also risen sharply in the course of the energy crisis, the domestic energy supplier wood is more popular than ever. However, the cheapest wood is not necessarily the most cost-efficient energy supplier.

German Blackout Experts Now Giving Blackout Courses

“I’m taking Blackout Basics. Which one did you enroll in?”

The folks who caused the situation in the first place (German voters) are now teaching each other how to avoid the situation they already caused in the first place. Go renewables! Nuclear energy? Nein, Danke!

Growing number of Germans won’t be left in dark with blackout courses – Once purely the stuff of action movie plots, the prospect of the lights going out in Europe’s biggest economy has become a conceivable threat during the current energy crisis.

Looking to be the heroes in a real-life blackout, a growing number of Germans are turning to citizens’ courses to learn how to act if they find themselves plunged into darkness.

“If the electricity goes out then absolutely nothing works any more. And we need to understand what ‘nothing working’ really means,” said Birgitt Eberlin, an instructor at the Workers’ Samaritan Federation (ASB).

German Of The Day: “Keine Deutsche Sonderwege”

That means no (more) Germany going it alone.

That’s a very popular political mantra here. You normally hear it right before Germany goes it alone again.

France and Germany’s relationship questioned as Scholz goes alone on policy – Germany has been criticized for approving a 200 billion euro ($200.2 billion) rescue package.

Fresh tensions between France and Germany are challenging their relationship at a time when their unity is critical for broader European policy in tackling the energy crisis.

The leaders of the two nations will meet in Paris on Wednesday, but this encounter almost got canceled.

German Of The Day: Arbeitsplatzabbau

That means job cuts.

Energy crisis: Quarter of German companies ‘plan to cut jobs’ – In order to tackle rising energy prices, a quarter of German companies revealed in a new survey that they planned to cut jobs, among other cost saving measures.

Around 25 percent of German companies plan to axe jobs as a cost saving measure, according to a survey of 1,080 German firms led by the Munich-based Stiftung Familienunternehmen released on Monday.

German Greens Discover A New “Core Value”

Not freezing to death.

Reality can be a bitch.

Nuclear power: German Greens put pragmatism first – The Green Party has seen challenges to its core principles ever since it became part of Germany’s three-party government. Pragmatism is forcing painful decisions on weapons exports, fossil fuels, and nuclear power.

“Party members are absolutely livid.”

Now That We Face A Crippling Shortage Of Natural Gas…

Let’s turn off our remaining nuclear power plants too.

We have a reputation for being gründlich (thorough), after all.

Germany’s scramble to revamp its energy policy – Germany woke up too late to the risks of energy dependence on Russia. Moscow’s natural gas shutoff may make it one of the hardest-hit EU economies.

At a dinner at the German embassy in London on October 23, 1980, German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt shocked British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher when he told her that West Germany relied upon the Soviet Union for 14 percent of its daily natural gas consumption. “That was very dangerous and unwise,” she said. Mr. Schmidt responded, “My dear Margaret, the Russians have always been the most reliable suppliers. They need us as much as we need them. There is no danger at all.” For nearly 40 years, the chancellor’s optimistic assessment appeared accurate, and Germany’s dependence on Russian gas only kept increasing.

We Not Only Supply You With Nuclear-Generated Electricity Already

(just like the Czech Republic). We’ll supply you with gas now too.

France starts sending natural gas directly to Germany – Technical adjustments were necessary as the single pipeline between the two countries was originally intended only to deliver gas (from Russia) from Germany to France.

If you haven’t noticed, Germany’s Green doesn’t stink.

Fun fact for you CO2 fans out there: The Germans generate 10 tons of CO2 per capita per year (some call it the “Carbon Footprint”), the nuclear-friendly French only do 6.