German Greens Red With Green Rage

Because the rest of Europe seems prepared to finally get rid of some out-dated Green ideological ballast. Time to bury an unshakeable, near-religious conviction that never had a place in the real world in the first place.

EU drafts plan to label gas and nuclear investments as green – The European Union has drawn up plans to label some natural gas and nuclear energy projects as “green” investments after a year-long battle between governments over which investments are truly climate-friendly.

The European Commission is expected to propose rules in January deciding whether gas and nuclear projects will be included in the EU “sustainable finance taxonomy”.

This is a list of economic activities and the environmental criteria they must meet to be labelled as green investments.

By restricting the “green” label to truly climate-friendly projects, the system aims to make those investments more attractive to private capital, and stop “greenwashing”, where companies or investors overstate their eco-friendly credentials.

Germans To Save The Environment By Destroying The Environment

Please don’t let Green Germans in on this climate crisis fun fact. It would only hurt their feelings.

Green utopians bravely ignore two fundamental problems with renewables: They are unreliable, thus requiring 100% backup, and energy-dilute, not energy-dense (like nuclear power), requiring huge tracts of land, transmission lines, mining, etc. (Apocalypse Never, Michael Shellenberger).

Wildlife concerns blunt Germany’s green power efforts – Germany is expanding its power grid to aid the transition to renewable energies, but local residents in some areas are holding up the process over concerns about wildlife.

“The problem is that wind energy is produced largely in the north, while many needs, especially industrial ones, are in the south. This electricity must therefore be transported using new networks,” Dierk Bauknecht, an expert at the Oeko-Institut research centre, told AFP.

To meet these needs, the German government has launched more than one hundred new power line projects over the past few years spanning 12,000 kilometres, according to official figures from the economy ministry.

Is It A Pangolin?

Is it a Piebald Squirrel? Maybe it’s a Kermode Bear?

Nope. But it is most definitely an extremely rare sighting in Germany. And in Berlin of all places. It is a so-called “pro-nuclear activist,” practically extinct, a highly endangered species indeed. They’re never seen in these parts. Not for very long. Poachers hunt them for their meat, hide, bones and hair.

German pro-nuclear activists make rare appearance in Berlin – With Germany set to shut down its last six reactors in 2022, a group of pro-nuclear activists made a rare appearance in Berlin over the weekend in the hope of reversing the decision. Operators, for their part, are wary of another abrupt policy change.

Talk The Talk Until You Drop

But walk the walk? How?

Renewables can’t generate enough energy. In Germany or elsewhere. The German “transition to renewables” isn’t doomed because it’s being done wrong. It’s doomed because our civilization can’t return to pre-modern life. Now, nuclear energy, on the other hand…

Can Germany – Europe’s biggest carbon polluter – clean up its act?

That climate change has figured prominently in the national election campaign now underway in Germany is hardly surprising.

Devastating flash floods that killed almost 200 people there this summer have focused even more attention on the issue in a country already reputed to be one of the most climate-conscious in the world. Around 50% of electricity in Germany comes from renewable energy sources, and the government in Berlin has signed up to some of the most ambitious decarbonization targets, including net-zero emissions by 2045 — five years earlier than most other developed economies…

Twenty percent of German power is generated by burning coal — about the same as in the U.S. — but a large amount of the German coal is of the most carbon polluting type, lignite…

Germany has committed to phasing out coal by 2038, but Laumanns would like to see a much quicker exit and hopes the government will be shamed into action at COP26.

I hope that it’s going to be an international humiliation for Germany, so that this green image of Germany is corrected,” he said.

Baby, It’s Coal Outside

But what could be more natural than coal, right? Is wind more natural? Why? How?

Germany: Coal tops wind as primary electricity source – In the first half of 2021, coal shot up as the biggest contributor to Germany’s electric grid, while wind power dropped to its lowest level since 2018. Officials say the weather is partly to blame.

The weather made us do it, the Greens will now explain. Like, duh. Are they finally starting to figure it out? The weather always makes us do it. The climate even (weather over time). It’s called not wanting to freeze to death.