A Massive Energy Cost Rise?

But where did this massive rise in energy costs come from? Who is responsible?

I know. We’ll ask the government to help us!

1 in 10 Germans had not yet heated by November despite cold weather: Survey – Germans have significantly changed their heating habits due to massive rise in energy costs, research finds.

German Of The Day: Energiepreis-Stoppschild

That means energy price stop sign.

This is a brilliant new German invention (both the word and the concept) meaning that energy providers must first explain why they will be raising prices before going ahead and raising them anyway. Thanks German government (the ones who created this energy crisis in Germany in the first place), German citizens are most certainly saying, we wouldn’t be able to sleep soundly at night without you.

Germany to force energy providers to justify future price hikes – The German government plans to allow energy providers to raise prices next year only if objectively justified, the economy ministry said on Saturday, denying a media report that Berlin planned a ban on all energy price hikes for consumers.

Alternatives Needed

Like a good alternative reality. Anybody got one handy?

After taking the latest concrete step to make Germany more dependent on China, the German government reminds everyone that Germany should stive to be less dependent on China.

Germany must be more trade independent from China, minister says -news portal – Germany’s Economy Minister Robert Habeck wants to make the German economy more independent from China by focusing on alternative furture markets.

Because The Harsh Realities Of Life Keep Raising Their Ugly Little Heads?

Like the cold of winter? Unaffordable energy bills? Renewable energy pipe dreams that will never succeed? You know. Stuff like that? That’s why.

Why can’t Germany break up with nuclear energy? – Germany has spent 25 years flipflopping on nuclear power. An energy crunch caused by the war in Ukraine is the latest reason to reconsider the technology.

“Really, I think of myself as against nuclear energy, but I have to admit that you see the situation a bit differently now.”

“We Must Not Make This Mistake Again”

While making this mistake again. The dependency mistake. See the Russian energy dependency mistake. This time it’s the hooked on China mistake.

China is a key market for German automakers including Volkswagen, BMW and Mercedes-Benz. If not the key market. And it will remain that way, despite the German government’s latest public relations move.

German auto industry could face tougher rules over China relations – Germany’s auto industry could face tougher rules on disclosing information over its China relations.

Germany’s foreign ministry plans to tighten the rules for companies including automakers that are deeply exposed to China, making them disclose more information and possibly conduct stress tests for geopolitical risks.

Time To Ship In That Evil US-Amerikan Fracking Gas

It doesn’t stink anymore either these days, for some reason.

Germany finishes construction of its first LNG import terminal – Completion of project in just 200 days eases fears of gas shortage amid cut in Russian supplies.

Liquefied gas is to secure the energy supply in the coming years. The first plant has already been completed in Wilhelmshaven, but terminals are also likely to follow at other locations.

We Germans Condemn The Iranian Regime’s Brutality Toward Protestors

As well as their open hostility toward Israel.

But boy oh boy their gas sure doesn’t stink.

Germany in secret talks to buy Iranian oil amid Russian war sanctions – The chief economist for the partially state-owned bank LBBW in the southwestern German state of Baden-Württemberg announced that Germany is engaged in secret talks with the Islamic Republic of Iran to buy Iranian oil.

“Intensive talks are already being held behind the scenes with Venezuela, Iran or Algeria to cover Germany’s oil and gasoline needs.”

German Of The Day: Am Günstigsten

That means the cheapest, the least expensive.

You know, like “which wood is the cheapest for heating?” Firewood is big these days in Germany for some reason. How green. Or something.

Expensive oak, cheap spruce or fragrant birch? Anyone who has a fireplace or wood-burning stove in their home has a great selection to choose from when it comes to firewood...

Heating is an important issue for many households this winter. Although the prices for firewood have also risen sharply in the course of the energy crisis, the domestic energy supplier wood is more popular than ever. However, the cheapest wood is not necessarily the most cost-efficient energy supplier.

German Blackout Experts Now Giving Blackout Courses

“I’m taking Blackout Basics. Which one did you enroll in?”

The folks who caused the situation in the first place (German voters) are now teaching each other how to avoid the situation they already caused in the first place. Go renewables! Nuclear energy? Nein, Danke!

Growing number of Germans won’t be left in dark with blackout courses – Once purely the stuff of action movie plots, the prospect of the lights going out in Europe’s biggest economy has become a conceivable threat during the current energy crisis.

Looking to be the heroes in a real-life blackout, a growing number of Germans are turning to citizens’ courses to learn how to act if they find themselves plunged into darkness.

“If the electricity goes out then absolutely nothing works any more. And we need to understand what ‘nothing working’ really means,” said Birgitt Eberlin, an instructor at the Workers’ Samaritan Federation (ASB).

Brexit Was Yesterday

Let’s let bygones be bygones. We’re friends again, right?

Now that we need to come groveling for your natural gas?

Germany keen to discuss natural gas pact with UK amid supply risk – Officials interested in deal that would allow two countries to bail each other out in event of shortages.

Such an agreement could be mutually beneficial for both London and Berlin, the German civil servant in charge of rationing in the case of a supply crisis told the Guardian in an interview.