German Of The Day: Existenzielle Bedrohung

That means existential threat. Like: “The existence of many companies is being threatened by the increased prices.”

German companies are supposed to save gas. But the switch to oil, for example, is being held back by bureaucracy and legal uncertainty.

The German government is calling for gas savings, with the Federal Minister of Economics leading the way – and yet, from the point of view of companies, the government is preventing exactly what it is calling for. Several associations say that it is very difficult for companies to obtain approval for retrofits.

With Lack Of Liberty And New COVID Measures For All

For the fall.

Old habits are hard to break. Especially when you’re on a roll. If you expect COVID, then COVID restrictions there will be.

Germany announces new Covid measures for fall, expecting another wave of infections – Wearing masks on planes and during long-distance travel by train and bus will be mandatory from October to early April all over Germany. Mandatory mask-wearing and the presentation of a negative coronavirus test will apply to hospitals, nursing homes and similar institutions with vulnerable people.

Many other rules will be implemented individually by the country’s 16 states depending on how severely the virus spreads in their regions. This could include the wearing of masks on local public transportation, in schools for students in grade five and up, and at public indoor events.

German Of The Day: Fortschritt

That means progress.

Germany’s Anti-Digital Law Is a Case Study in Stunting Progress – Germany just passed a law that completely bans digital contracts and signatures. Whether you’re a coder who finds jobs online, an Amazon delivery guy or a Dilbert character, you’ll now get the fine print of your terms on paper — the dead-tree kind. And it’ll have your new boss’s signature in just-dried ink. If employers provide a digital contract instead, they’ll get fined up to 2,000 euros ($2,049) for each instant.

The Long And Winding Road

Of German bureaucracy. Has it finally come to an end for Tesla?

I still wouldn’t bet on it.

Tesla to win approval for $5.5 billion Berlin gigafactory on Friday – The German state of Brandenburg has called a news conference for Friday at which it is widely expected to approve Tesla’s (TSLA.O) 5 billion euro ($5.5 billion) gigafactory near Berlin if certain conditions are met.

“The approval procedure for the e-car and battery factory of the U.S. company Tesla in Gruenheide in Brandenburg is nearing completion,” the state government said in a statement.

Tesla Model Ys Spotted In German Forest

Covered in red tape.

Several Tesla Model Y vehicles have been spotted at Gigafactory Berlin. Production has been expected to start any day, but official environmental approval is still uncertain.

Over the last year, Tesla has run into a lot of red tape while trying to get approval to start production at Gigafactory Berlin, a giant new factory located near Berlin in Brandenburg. Most recently, environmental groups had managed to obtain an extension of the public commentary period for the project, which delayed approval for another month. The new period concluded last month, and Tesla has been rumored to be on the verge of approval, but it has yet to happen.

For Being Such A Smart Guy It’s Odd That He Still Hasn’t Figured It Out

I guess you have to live here for a while to get it.

If German bureaucracy gets all up in your face when trying to get some commonplace document, as it does, then it’s certainly going to ruin your day (year? life?) when you try to build a gigafactory.

Tesla’s Elon Musk bemoans German red tape, again – Tesla Inc Chief Executive Elon Musk took to Twitter to bemoan a consultation process launched on Tuesday for local citizens to express objections to a huge factory he is building near Berlin.

The process, being repeated over concerns the first time around did not comply with regulations, is a snag in Tesla’s plans to start production of electric cars this month.

“Sigh.”

Electric Cars Made In Germany

Shanghai, Germany.

Tesla is expected to start European deliveries of its China-built Model Y SUVs in a few weeks.

The first vehicles will be handed over to customers in Germany in August, the German news agency dpa reported, citing an official Tesla communication.

The vehicles will be exported from Tesla’s factory in Shanghai.

Tesla originally planned to start production of the Model Y in July at its new European factory in Gruenheide near Berlin, with deliveries scheduled to begin in the third quarter, but the plant’s production start has been delayed to the end of this year or early next year.

Tesla Now Building Tanks

Bombastically bureaucratic and terribly touchy about tanks ever since World War II, German authorities will now be fining Tesla for building them at its new car factory near Berlin.

Its planned new car factory near Berlin, I should say.

The environment ministry for Brandenburg, the state that surrounds Berlin and in which the factory will be located, had found that Tesla had constructed tanks on the territory for which it had no authorisation, wrote Tagesspiegel newspaper, which first reported the fine.

The company was banned from using the tanks it had already built, the newspaper added.

German Of The Day: Hoffnung Stirbt Zuletzt

That means hope dies last.

Tesla Giga Berlin: Minister still hopeful for 2021 launch despite final approval delay – Tesla Giga Berlin is still waiting for final environmental approval from Brandenburg’s State Office for the Environment (LfU). Despite this, the state’s Minister of Economics, Jörg Steinbach, remains hopeful that Tesla will produce its first vehicle in Giga Berlin by the end of this year.

Bureaucracy is the key. The key to stopping anything from ever getting done. And German bureaucracy is made in Germany, after all. There is a reputation to keep up.

Bureaucracy? In Germany?

No way.

No way this is a news item, I mean.

Tesla’s Musk blames bureaucracy for German gigafactory delays – Tesla Chief Executive Elon Musk called for cuts to German red tape on Monday as he said it was unclear when exactly the first electric car would roll off the production line of its planned plant outside Berlin.

This guy really is a visionary, a dreamer. If he actually believes this could ever be possible in Germany: “There should be some kind of active process for removal of rules. Otherwise, over time, the rules will just accumulate and you get more and more rules until eventually you can’t do anything.”