But German Green EnvironMENTALism Isn’t About Control

We just tell you what we will permit you to eat.

As a first step. There will soon be new measures to follow. Remember: We’re only doing this for your own good.

Berlin’s university canteens go almost meat-free as students prioritise climate – The 34 outlets catering to students at four universities will offer only a single meat option four days a week.

The 34 canteens and cafes catering to Berlin’s sizeable student population at four different universities will offer from October a menu that is 68% vegan, 28% vegetarian, and 2% fish-based, with a single meat option offered four days a week.

No More Wurst Puns

Because this really is the wurst-case scenario.

Is nothing sacred?

When Volkswagen dared to announce this week it will purge currywurst from the menu at one of its canteens in Wolfsburg and serve up meatless alternatives instead, a veritable online food fight broke out.

“Currywurst with French fries is one of the power bars of the skilled production worker. It should stay that way.”

Inexpensive Meat?

We’ll fix that for you real quick. For your own good, of course.

Meat

Germany: ‘Meat tax’ on the table to protect the climate – meat is relatively cheap for consumers in Germany. But that could all be about to change as lawmakers from across the political spectrum back proposals aimed at climate protection and animal welfare.

German politicians from the Social Democrats (SPD) and the Greens on Wednesday proposed raising the value added tax (VAT) on meat to the standard rate of 19%. Currently, meat is taxed at a reduced rate of 7% like most foodstuffs.

“A meat tax, such as increasing the VAT to 19%, could be a way forward.”

PS: German Oddity 10. Germans have more words for taxation than Eskimos have for snow.

Meat Me At The Barbeque

How smart was the Green Party’s election pledge to introduce a weekly vegetarian day? Oh, I dunno. But more than 85 percent of Germans eat meat daily or almost daily. So you do the math.

Meat

Massive web surveillance by the US? German voters seem to have lost interest. The euro crisis? Boring. Comprehensive minimum wage? Zzzzzz. It has been a somnolent election season thus far. At least until this week. Suddenly, the German electorate is up in arms, furious with a proposal made by the Green Party which, many fear, could violate one of their most cherished rights: that of eating sausage whenever they want.