Schools Reopen In Germany

“But the coronavirus is not gone.”

Schools

Politicians are agreed on the need to avoid large-scale closures. But the coronavirus is not gone.

Schools are considered lower-risk and many doctors favor a return to the normal schoolday. But the coronavirus is not gone.

In May and June, 2,600 students and teachers were tested as part of a pilot project and not a single acute infection was found. But the coronavirus is not gone.

Fewer than 20 of those tested had antibodies in their blood, which usually indicates an infection in the past. But the coronavirus is not gone.

Experts say a new lockdown would have negative psychological and physical repercussions for young people. But the coronavirus is not gone.

The German teacher’s union doesn’t want the schools to open, however. Because the coronavirus is not gone.

Where’s The Pork?

German oddity 415. The pig is big here. Germans have more pig and sow idioms then wurst varieties – and that’s a whole lot. They also seem to think that any phrase or saying can be improved just by adding the words pig or sow to it, thus making said phrase or saying saugut (sow good or damned fine).

Pork

So what about this German oddity in the news today? After a German day care center in Leipzig decided not to offer pork on its meal plan anymore (gee, I wonder why?) threats started coming in. The police have now decided to guard the place.

And after BILD decided to report about the day care center’s decision the hashtag #Schweinefleisch (pork) reached the number one spot in Germany.

Polizeischutz für Kita ohne Schweinefleisch in Leipzig.

German Of The Day: Bußgeld

No, that doesn’t mean bus money. It means fine or penalty.

Fine

And that’s what the parents of the kids who have been taking part in Joan of Arc’s, I mean, Greta Thunberg’s wackedelic Fridays for Future (FFF) demonstrations will now have to be paying. At least here in Germany.

German school authorities are starting to get tired of all the truancy going on or something and have begun handing out fines starting at 88.50 euros a pop. Jeepers. That might get FFF-freakin’ expensive before too long, folks.

Eltern von Klimaschutzdemonstranten müssen Bußgeld bezahlen – Seit Monaten demonstriert Fridays for Future für besseren Klimaschutz. Weil das auch während der Schulzeit geschieht, wird in Mannheim das Ordnungsamt aktiv.

Let Us All Learn Together

And hold hands together. And show solidarity for one another. You know, all that kind of wonderful gooey fooey social activist stuff that “Social” Democrats do.

School

But even though I’m a big time SPD public school education advocate and multi-cultural integration cheerleader poster girl kinda woman – and former Federal Minister for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth and current Minister President of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania – I still prefer to send my kid to a private school, if you don’t mind. Even if you do mind I’ll be sending my kid to a private school. There’s way less riff-raff there.

Mecklenburg-Vorpommerns Ministerpräsidentin Manuela Schwesig (SPD) steht wegen der Entscheidung, ihr älteres Kind, Sohn Julian (10), zum Schuljahresbeginn auf eine Privatschule zu schicken, in der Kritik. Nach Ansicht der Links-Opposition im Landtag offenbart der Schritt die Mängel und Lücken im staatlichen Schulsystem.

Last Place Again!

The same procedure as last year. The same procedure as every year?

Last Place

The latest education study indicates that when it comes to the 16 German Bundesländer (states) and their school systems, Berlin schools come in 16th again. The states that seem to have their stuff together are Saxony, Thuringia (both in the Evil East!), Bavaria and Baden-Wuerttemberg.

We’re poor but sexy. So we don’t need no education.

Die Hauptstadt erreichte bei dem Vergleich der Bildungssysteme der Bundesländer des arbeitgebernahen Instituts der deutschen Wirtschaft (IW) insgesamt wie im Vorjahr Rang 16.